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Coping With the Stigma of Psoriasis

You can't always hide your psoriasis, but you can learn strategies to help you cope, especially when others react to your skin. Try these tips to make living with psoriasis skin easier.

By Beth W. Orenstein
Medically reviewed by Lindsey Marcellin, MD, MPH

Even people with mild psoriasis may have a tough time coping because this skin disease is so visible — and misunderstood. Most people with psoriasis have experienced people asking questions, making rude comments, or steering clear because they’re afraid it’s contagious.

Many people cover their psoriasis skin with long sleeves and long pants, but that’s hard to do when psoriasis is on your face (although this location is less common) or on your hands and legs when it’s hot or you’re at the gym or the beach.

So what do you do when you have red, scaly plaques on your arms and legs, but have to go to work or want to be out in public at the mall or a restaurant? How do you explain psoriasis skin to people whose biggest worry might be that it’s contagious — although it’s not? “Even my wife asked me that,” says Alan Eisenberg, 63, of Portland, Ore., who was diagnosed with guttate psoriasis — one of the more common types of psoriasis — four years ago.

Jerry Bagel, MD, of the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey in East Windsor and associate professor of dermatology at Columbia University, believes the best way for people with psoriasis symptoms to cope is to get aggressive medical therapy. “If you can clear your skin, your behavior will change significantly,” he said.

But as people with psoriasis know all too well, even with treatment, flares occur and can be unpredictable.

Eisenberg and Dr. Bagel offer these coping strategies:

Become an expert. The more you know about psoriasis and psoriasis symptoms, the better you will be able to respond to anyone who stares or makes rude comments. Educating others about the disease can reduce the stigma — if they know what it is and that it is not contagious, they won’t be afraid, Bagel says. Eisenberg adds that when he was first diagnosed, he went online to learn as much as he could about psoriasis symptoms so that when someone made a comment about his psoriasis skin, he could address it intelligently.

Adjust your attitude. It’s not easy, Eisenberg says, but your best weapon is learning not to be bothered by the stares and comments. “When I first had these plaques all over my body, it bothered me and I wore long sleeves and long pants no matter how hot it was outside,” he says. “But then one day, I said to myself that if people are going to stare, I’m going to accept that it’s not my problem, it’s their problem, and I’ve been happier since.”

Don’t hide. You don’t have to tell anyone about your skin condition if you don’t want to. But it’s hard to live in constant fear of exposure.It can put you under a great deal of stress, and stress is one of the factors that can make psoriasis worse, Bagel says. You’re more likely to find that the people you care about will understand, especially once they understand more about the disease.

Seek support. Joining a support group is a great way to learn about psoriasis and what works for others battling it. You may get treatment ideas to discuss with your doctor, and tips on managing the disease. Eisenberg says he learned useful diet tips and information about soaps and moisturizers from other people with psoriasis — and shared his own successes. It also helps, he adds, “to know that you are not alone, that there are others in the same boat as you.” According to the National Psoriasis Institute, psoriasis affects up to 7.5 million people in the United States or 2.2 percent of the population.

If your psoriasis is causing you to be depressed or to have thoughts of harming yourself, you should seek professional help. Therapy can help you to understand what’s happening to your body, and provide skills for coping and fighting back.

“Kids with psoriasis tend to be 'thinner-skinned,' emotionally speaking,” Bagel says. “It’s important for moms and dads to talk to their child’s teachers, nurses, and phys ed teachers so that they’re not ridiculed in class.” Support groups for kids can be particularly helpful because kids often need to see it’s not just them, he stresses.

People with psoriasis have been stigmatized since ancient times, Bagel says, but with the right strategies, knowledge, and support, you can educate others about psoriasis and enjoy your life — whether your psoriasis is covered or not.

Last Updated: 02/24/2011
This section created and produced exclusively by the editorial staff of
EverydayHealth.com © 2011 EverydayHealth.com; all rights reserved.

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Psoriasis: Feeling Comfortable With Your Skin

You may not be able to avoid stares when parts of your body are covered with red, scaly psoriasis flares. But you can learn to cope with the emotions that can accompany this very visible skin disorder.

By Beth W. Orenstein
Medically reviewed by Lindsey Marcellin, MD, MPH

When Alan Eisenberg, 63, of Portland, Ore., was first diagnosed with guttate psoriasis, he had trouble going out, especially to the gym or the pool, because people would stare or make rude comments. “For a while it bothered me, and I would wear long sleeves no matter how hot it was. I didn’t wear shorts ever,” he says.

But then Eisenberg learned to respond: “When people stare at my face or back and say, ‘What’s wrong with you?’ I say, ‘It’s just psoriasis. It’s not contagious and I hope you and your family and friends never get this.’ ”

Like many people with psoriasis, Eisenberg had to learn how to deal with not only the psoriasis flares, but also the emotional effects. A few strategies have helped Eisenberg improve his self-esteem when his psoriasis flares, including learning all that he can about the skin disease and knowing that he is not alone. According to the National Psoriasis Foundation, as many as 7.5 million Americans — about 2.2 percent of the population — have psoriasis.

Eisenberg, who developed psoriatic arthritis a few months after his psoriasis diagnosis, is active in support groups locally, nationally, and online. “Support groups help a whole lot because they allow you to share knowledge,” he says. “You learn what works for others in the same boat and what doesn’t — and when you have psoriasis you want to try everything.”

The National Psoriasis Foundation has more than 40 support groups where people can talk about living with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. The Foundation also hosts an online message board that offers advice to others who have both conditions.

Practical Steps to Improve Self-Esteem

Try these tips to help you feel comfortable with your skin and improve your self-esteem, even when your psoriasis symptoms flare:

  • Get educated so you can educate others. People are often uncomfortable with what they don’t understand, says Jerry Bagel, MD, of the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey in East Windsor and associate professor of dermatology at Columbia University in New York. If you are armed with information about psoriasis and what causes psoriasis flares, you can patiently and calmly inform people who stare or make rude comments.
  • Develop a support system. Share your thoughts and concerns about your psoriasis with trusted loved ones, such as friends, family, and caregivers. You’ll feel better about yourself if you don’t keep your emotions bottled up inside.
  • Learn to relax and alleviate stress. Stress has been shown to aggravate psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, says Dr. Bagel. Adds Eisenberg, “I do a lot of things to keep myself moving and from stiffening up — meditation and tai chi, which help me to relax and stay calm.”
  • Learn to think positively. Don’t be hard on yourself. “Having psoriasis is not your fault,” Eisenberg says. The right attitude can go a long way toward helping you face your condition and manage it as best you can. He adds that it’s not uncommon to feel anger after being diagnosed with psoriasis, and then depression. These are common emotional reactions, he says, adding, “But then you must learn to deal with it.”
  • Find a physician experienced with psoriasis. “Some dermatologists are more interested in psoriasis than others. You need to find physicians interested in taking care of psoriasis and helping you,” Bagel says. Psoriasis cannot be cured, but it can be controlled. If you work with your doctor, you can learn to manage your psoriasis with a number of different treatments, and if your psoriasis is under control, it will help to improve your self-esteem. “I’ve heard psoriasis patients complain that their dermatologists don’t take their skin seriously enough,” Bagel says. If you don’t think your doctor is helping you, find someone who will.
  • Reconsider covering up. Some people find it easier to keep their arms and legs covered, no matter what the weather, but that can be uncomfortable, especially in the heat of summer. Eisenberg says he always covered up at first, as did a friend who has psoriasis. It takes some guts to bare your plaque patches in public, he says, but if you have enough self-esteem, you can do it.

Because psoriasis is a chronic skin condition, you won’t always be able to avoid flares. But with knowledge, support, and the right medical treatment, you can feel better about yourself and have a healthy, positive attitude about your life.

Last Updated: 02/24/2011
This section created and produced exclusively by the editorial staff of
EverydayHealth.com © 2011 EverydayHealth.com; all rights reserved.

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Dr. Jerry Bagel Receives Top Referrer Award for Second Year in a Row

National Psoriasis Foundation Recognizes Local Dermatologist for Ongoing Commitment to Patients

February 21, 2011EAST WINDSOR, NJ – Dr. Jerry Bagel, a nationally recognized expert in the treatment of psoriasis, was recognized by the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) for the second year in a row as the nation’s number one recruiter of patients with psoriasis. He was recognized on February 4, 2011 at the 69th Annual American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) Annual Meeting in New Orleans.

Dr. Bagel has over 25 years of experience treating Central New Jersey patients with psoriasis and related health conditions. He joined the NPF Medical Board in May 2010 to provide guidance and expertise to the organization on all medical issues related to psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. NPF honored Dr. Bagel with this award for his overall outstanding treatment of psoriasis and commitment to patient care.

Additionally, Dr. Bagel gave a presentation describing his research on the efficacy and safety of Etenercept in the treatment of scalp psoriasis, further demonstrating his ability to stay on the cutting edge of psoriasis treatment.

“I am deeply honored to receive this award again,” said Bagel. “I will continue to do my best to ensure patients have access to various psoriasis treatment options that will ultimately help them gain their confidence back and maintain healthy skin.”

Since 2001, Dr. Bagel has served as an advisor to NPF’s Board of Trustees, its CEO and staff, providing medical guidance, editorial review of publications, speaking at professional meetings and working to identify issues and opportunities of critical importance to the group. Dr. Bagel founded NPF’s President's Council and has raised nearly $1 million in the past five years for psoriasis care and research.

For more information about Windsor Dermatology, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

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About Windsor Dermatology
Windsor Dermatology is a practice composed of board certified medical dermatologists focused on helping area adults, adolescents and children achieve and maintain healthy skin. The East Windsor-based practice is also home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey and has treated various disorders of the skin, hair and nails for over 25 years. For more information, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

About the National Psoriasis Foundation
The National Psoriasis Foundation is the world’s largest nonprofit patient advocacy organization dedicated to fighting psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, and the voice for millions of Americans who are affected by these diseases. Our mission is to find a cure for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and to eliminate their devastating effects through research, advocacy and education. For more information, visit www.psoriasis.org.

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Amgen, Pfizer Say Enbrel Mitigates Scalp Damage In Psoriasis

by RTT Staff Writer

February 2, 2011 —Amgen Inc. (AMGN: News ) and Pfizer Inc. (PFE: News ), said Friday the trials of its arthritis and skin medication Enbrel showed the drug, when compared with placebo, perceptibly improved scalp conditions in adult patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, a skin disorder.

The drug met its primary endpoint of improvement in scalp severity, but indicated adverse events with three patients reporting serious effects.

The data from the trial is to be presented today at the 69th Annual American Academy of Dermatology meet in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Jerry Bagel, medical director, Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey, said the data supports the efficacy and safety profile of the drug for adult patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

Psoriasis is a chronic disease of the immune system that causes the skin cells to grow at an faster rate. About 7.5 million American adults suffer from psoriasis. Symptoms include painful and itchy red, scaly patches that appear on the skin.

Enbrel is a drug that interferes with the tumor necrosis factor, a part of the immune system. It was first approved in 1998 for rheumatoid arthritis and was later endorsed to treat children and adolescents with juvenile RA. In 2004, the drug was approved to treat adult chronic moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

But, Enbrel has been known to impair the immune system, and cause serious infections such as tuberculosis, with some patients having succumbed to them.

Still, the drug continues to be a money spinner for the two companies. For the fourth quarter, Amgen's sales of Enbrel increased 3 percent to $939 million from a year ago, while Pfizer reported a 129 percent jump in sales at $865 million, outside of the U.S. and Canada.

Results of the Enbrel trial is based on a 12 week study, which included two groups.

While Group A, solely on different dosages of Enbrel for 24 weeks, showed 84 percent improvement, Group B patients on placebo therapy followed by Enbrel, showed 20 percent improvement.

About 75 percent of patients on Enbrel were satisfied with their treatment, compared with 21 percent for placebo.

Nevertheless, 67.8 percent of the patients reported at least one adverse events such as upper respiratory tract infections, nasopharyngitis, and headache. Three patients reported five serious events, namely cholecystitis/cholelithiasis, fall/rib fracture and metastatic malignant melanoma.

AMGN is trading at $55.26, down $0.19 or 0.34%, on a volume of 1.8 million shares on the Nasdaq.

PFE is trading at $19.14, down $0.03 or 0.16%, on a volume of 23.56 million shares on the NYSE.

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Commentaries on Psoriasis: The Physical and Emotional Aspects of Psoriasis

www.PsoriasisTX.com

Dr. Jerry Bagel was interviewed as part of a panel discussion on the physical and emotional aspects of psoriasis. As a member of the National Psoriasis Foundation’s Medical Board, Dr. Bagel provided insights from a clinical perspective and shared his experiences in treating psoriatic patients.

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Future Anthropologist Explores Indian Diaspora

Bridget Bagel Presents Paper as Part of the Annual Conference on South Asia

November 11, 2010—EAST WINDSOR, NJ – Drawing on her Central New Jersey upbringing, Bridget Bagel, daughter of Dr. Jerry Bagel, medical director of Windsor Dermatology in East Windsor, New Jersey, presented her research exploring the cultural ramifications of Indian migration to the U.S. at the Annual Conference on South Asia in Madison, Wisconsin.

The research paper entitled “Cultural Mediators and Global Citizens: Work and Identity at an Indian Restaurant” was presented as part of a panel titled “Working for Meaning: Work, Identity, and South Asians in a Globalized World,” which additionally included papers written by Wake Forest University Professor Sandya Hewamanne, and fellow student Meenakshi Krishnan. Bagel, an anthropology major in her senior year at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, conducted ethnographic research at a family-owned and operated Indian restaurant and grocery store in North Carolina for a period of six months after receiving a grant from the University.

The paper focused on food as a space of cultural negotiation, where connections to cultures are maintained, re-worked and recreated, and commented on how restaurant owners find a sense of self that is meaningful to them as cultural intermediaries.

“People of South Asian origin stay connected to their cultures even as they connect to the majority of white American clientele through cuisine,” said Bagel. “My research examined cultural barriers as well as areas of true connection and I was honored to have the opportunity to explain it to my peers at this conference.”

“In an increasingly global community, it’s important that we learn from each other’s experiences,” said Dr. Jerry Bagel. “My daughter’s research has helped me identify with, and better understand, the experiences of our Indian patients.”

Windsor Dermatology is a practice composed of board certified medical dermatologists focused on helping area adults, adolescents and children achieve and maintain healthy skin. In addition to a specific focus on the treatment of psoriasis, the medical staff is skilled at the treatment of vitiligo and other conditions that present a significant burden in people of color. For more information about Windsor Dermatology, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

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About Windsor Dermatology
Windsor Dermatology is a practice composed of board certified medical dermatologists focused on helping area adults, adolescents and children achieve and maintain healthy skin. The East Windsor-based practice is also home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey and has treated various disorders of the skin, hair and nails for 25 years. For more information, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

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NPF Reports: Nearly half of kids with psoriasis surveyed report being bullied

Survey finds emotional impact of the disease greatly affects children

October 25, 2010—PORTLAND, OR – Almost half of children with psoriasis surveyed by the National Psoriasis Foundation report being bullied at least once in the last six months. The Psoriasis Foundation surveyed parents of kids with psoriatic disease and found that 44 percent of children have been bullied by their peers, and 38 percent of kids say the abuse was a direct result of their disease.

The survey found the most common forms of bullying endured by these children are teasing, being excluded by classmates and name calling. According to the survey, the emotional impact of this abuse on children was great:

  • More than 60 percent of those bullied say it causes anxiety
  • Nearly half (47 percent) of those bullied report crying
  • Nearly one-quarter (23.5 percent) of those bullied had a decrease in academic performance
  • Nearly one-quarter (23.5 percent) of those bullied had difficulty sleeping

One parent reports that because of the teasing her daughter “locks herself in her bedroom and refuses to socialize with other kids.” Another child’s parents say their son was forced to switch schools after the abuse became physical. The survey findings reveal that other children experience panic attacks, low self-esteem and bouts of depression.

Psoriasis, a chronic, noncontagious disease of the immune system that appears on the skin, is the most common autoimmune disease in the country. Psoriasis is the most prevalent autoimmune disease in the country—affecting approximately 9,150 people in Mercer County, nearly 220,000 New Jersey residents and as many as 7.5 million Americans.

Up to 30 percent of people with psoriasis develop psoriatic arthritis, a related joint condition. Nearly one-third of people develop psoriasis before age 20, yet this youth population is often underserved.

In an effort to demonstrate the challenges of childhood psoriasis and the need for public awareness, the National Psoriasis Foundation surveyed parents about bullying in conjunction with World Psoriasis Day, a global event held each year on Oct. 29. This year’s theme, “Childhood psoriasis: A challenge for us all,” highlights the effect of psoriasis on children and their families.

To combat bullying, many survey respondents say they have spoken to their child’s teachers and school staff about psoriasis. They also have educated their child’s classmates about the disease and spoken directly with parents of their child’s friends.

This year’s World Psoriasis Day event in the United States gives children and families additional opportunities to tackle bullying by raising awareness about the seriousness of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. On Oct. 29, the National Psoriasis Foundation wants to empower kids, and their families, to take action for a cure by participating in activities at www.psoriasis.org/wpd.

For more information about the survey on childhood bullying and psoriasis, visit www.psoriasis.org/wpd. To learn more about World Psoriasis Day around the globe, visit www.worldpsoriasisday.com.

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About the National Psoriasis Foundation
The National Psoriasis Foundation is the world's largest nonprofit organization serving people with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Our mission is to find a cure for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and to eliminate their devastating effects through research, advocacy and education. For more information, call the Psoriasis Foundation, headquartered in Portland, Ore., at 800.723.9166, or visit www.psoriasis.org.

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Healthy Skin = Healthy Bodies

Dr. Jerry Bagel Encourages Residents to Monitor Their Skin to Stay Healthy

September 30, 2010—EAST WINDSOR, NJ – Dr. Jerry Bagel, a leading provider of medical dermatological care for 25 years, is urging residents throughout Central New Jersey to monitor their skin to help keep their bodies healthy.

“It is crucial to make sure we continue to monitor our skin for any irregularities and schedule regular check-ups, as the skin can often be a sign of something more serious going on in the body,” said Bagel. “The more we take care of ourselves and our skin, the healthier our bodies will be.”

Dr. Bagel is available to provide his expertise on the following medical dermatological areas:

  • Serious health conditions that occur with psoriasis. According to MedicineNet.com, psoriasis currently affects roughly 7.5 million to 8.5 million people in the U.S.
  • Monitoring irregular moles that may lead to skin cancer. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, melanoma claims the life of one American almost every hour.
  • Other skin/nail conditions that help diagnose medical ailments such as diabetes, thyroid disease, arthritis, and basal cell carcinoma.

Dr. Bagel is board certified in dermatology and is a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. His practice in East Windsor, New Jersey is home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey, the only treatment center in the region. In 2001 and 2003, he was named one of the top doctors in the state by New Jersey Monthly magazine and has been named a Top Doc in the Castle Connolly survey of physicians every year for the past 10 years. A Senior Attending Physician at the University Medical Center at Princeton, he is also a Clinical Associate Professor of Dermatology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and teaches at the Drexel University College of Medicine. He is regularly invited to speak across the country about the treatment of various dermatological conditions.

For more information about Windsor Dermatology, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

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About Windsor Dermatology
Windsor Dermatology is a practice composed of board certified medical dermatologists focused on helping area adults, adolescents and children achieve and maintain healthy skin. The East Windsor-based practice is also home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey and has treated various disorders of the skin, hair, and nails for 25 years. For more information, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

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Windsor Dermatology’s Jerry Bagel, M.D. Named a Castle Connolly Top Doctor for 10th Year in a Row

September 1, 2010—EAST WINDSOR, NJ – Jerry Bagel, M.D., medical director of Windsor Dermatology and the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey, has been named a Top Doctor for the 10th year in a row by Castle Connolly Medical Ltd., a healthcare research, information, and publishing company.

Castle Connolly’s Top Doctors™ selection process begins with surveys of physicians and healthcare professionals. Each year, Castle Connolly surveys thousands of physicians and other healthcare professionals and asks them to identify excellent doctors in every specialty in their region and throughout the nation. Castle Connolly then works with over 40 national and regional publications to provide the information for their annual “Top Doctors” features, helping Americans make educated decisions about their health care.

“I’m honored to have been selected once again from among hundreds of physicians,” said Dr. Bagel. “I will continue to do my best to live up to the title of ‘Top Doctor’ and help our patients maintain healthy skin.”

Dr. Bagel is board certified in dermatology and is a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. Celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, his practice in East Windsor, New Jersey is home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey, the only treatment center in the region. A Senior Attending Physician at the University Medical Center at Princeton, he is also a Clinical Associate Professor of Dermatology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and teaches at the Drexel University College of Medicine. He is regularly invited to speak across the country about the treatment of various dermatological conditions.

For more information about Windsor Dermatology, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

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About Windsor Dermatology
Windsor Dermatology is a practice composed of board certified medical dermatologists focused on helping adults and children in the area achieve and maintain healthy skin. The East Windsor-based practice is also home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey and has treated various disorders of the skin, hair, and nails for 25 years. For more information, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

About Castle Connolly Medical Ltd.
Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. is America's trusted source for identifying Top Doctors. Castle Connolly has been empowering consumers by helping them find information about quality healthcare for nearly 20 years as a leading healthcare research, information, and publishing company. Castle Connolly works with over 40 national and regional publications, such as Redbook, Ladies Home Journal, Men's Health, New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago to provide the information for their annual "Top Doctors" features. The company also publishes the consumer guides America's Top Doctors®, America's Top Doctors® for Cancer, Top Doctors: New York Metro Area, The Best in Senior Living & Eldercare Options and The ABCs of HMOs. Founded in 1991 by John K. Castle (Chairman) and John J. Connolly, Ed.D. (President and CEO), who served as board chairman, and president and CEO of New York Medical College, respectively, its mission is to help consumers find the best healthcare. They achieve that mission through their consumer guides, their website and various consumer and business-oriented print and online partnerships. Under the direction of its physician-lead research team, Castle Connolly surveys tens of thousands of physicians and hospital executives in order to identify, screen and, ultimately, select those physicians regarded by their peers as leaders in their specialties and for specific diseases and techniques. Castle Connolly's valuable top doctors information can also be accessed online at its website, www.castleconnolly.com and on other affiliated websites. Castle Connolly can also be found at www.facebook.com/TopDoctors and www.twitter.com/castleconnolly.

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HEALTHWISE: Education Needed About Psoriasis, Its Effects

By Jeff Weber, Staff Writer
http://www.mycentraljersey.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=20108300335

August 30, 2010—August was National Psoriasis Awareness Month, and according to the National Psoriasis Foundation, psoriasis is the most common autoimmune disease in the United States, affecting as many as 7.5 million Americans.

Just because the calendar is about to flip to September doesn't mean psoriasis will go away. That's the message Dr. Jerry Bagel is trying to send out.

Bagel is board-certified in dermatology and is a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. His practice in East Windsor is home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central Jersey, the only center of its kind in the region.

Bagel recently addressed some of the most important factors concerning psoriasis. Here's what he had to say:

Roughly what percentage of your patient base is psoriasis patients?

We have seen more than 5,000 individuals with psoriasis over the past seven years. According to a recent Mayo Clinic Study, the incidence of psoriasis has doubled over the past 25 years.

One percent to 2 percent of the U.S. population is afflicted with psoriasis. Of these individuals, about 30 percent have psoriasis on more than 10 percent of their body surface, and 25 percent have psoriatic arthritis — a potentially disabling condition similar to rheumatoid arthritis, which can result in permanent destruction of the joints.

What major health risks are there for psoriatics?

Psoriatic arthritis affects 25 percent of people with psoriasis and usually occurs 10 years after the onset of psoriasis. Aggressive therapy limits the progression of joint destruction, alleviating disability.

Psoriatics have a two-fold increase in depression and use antidepressive meds 71 percent more than the nonpsoriatic population. There is an increase in suicidal ideation in psoriatics.

There is a four-fold increase in heart attacks and three-fold increase in strokes in young adults with severe psoriasis.

There is a two-fold increase in diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome in psoriatics and a slight increase in lymphoma in severe psoriatics. There is also an increased frequency of Crohn's disease with psoriasis.

In your opinion, why is an awareness month needed?

Awareness is necessary for two major reasons. When Judy with psoriasis, who is 10, is not allowed to play with Jill, because Jill's mom thinks Judy has a contagious disease, we see education is necessary to dispel the myth of psoriasis being contagious.

Unfortunately, 50 percent of people with severe psoriasis see physicians and are only treated with topical treatments, i.e., they are not treated aggressively enough.

One of the most poignant moments of my professional career was eight years ago was when addressing 450 people with psoriasis at a conference. Their collective voice echoed, "You don't know what it's like to be in our skin." They were saying they need to be treated more aggressively; they want to have clear skin.

What can Central Jersey residents do to raise awareness for psoriasis?

Facilitate support groups. I am working with the National Psoriasis Foundation to develop a Psoriasis Patients Bill of Rights. Otherwise, people can join the walks, get other dermatologists on board and educate nurses at schools.

More information about Bagel's practice and psoriasis is available by visiting www.windsordermatology.com.

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Psoriasis Associated with Depression and Suicide

By Frederik Joelving, Reuters Health

http://www.health.am/ab/more/psoriasis-tied-to-depression-suicide/
http://www.health24.com/news/Sun/1-948,57818.asp

August 17, 2010—People with the skin condition psoriasis are more likely to be depressed, anxious and thinking about suicide, than those without the problem, according to a new study of British adults.

Researchers found that nearly one in ten people with mild psoriasis had been depressed at some point—more than twice as many as among people without the disease. And in severe cases, the depression rate rose even further.

“Psoriasis has a profound impact on patients’ well being,” said Dr. Joel Gelfand, of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, who worked on the study. “It’s likely that there are tens of thousands of extra cases of depression and suicidal thoughts due to psoriasis.”

Dr. Jerry Bagel, a psoriasis expert who wasn’t involved in the study, said the results weren’t surprising.

“People with psoriasis are wearing long-sleeve clothing in August,” Bagel, of the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey, told Reuters Health.

“You get a 17-year-old girl with psoriasis on three percent of her body, and she is going to hide,” he added.

Psoriasis affects up to three in 100 Americans, according to the new report, published in the Archives of Dermatology. It results from overactive immune cells, which attack healthy skin and cause red, itchy patches and rapid build-up of scales.

Almost three-quarters of people with the condition say it makes them feel angry and self-conscious, a recent survey from the National Psoriasis Foundation shows.

For the new study, the researchers tapped into a population-wide British database of electronic medical records from 1987 to 2002, including roughly 146,000 people with mild psoriasis, 4,000 with severe psoriasis, and 767,000 psoriasis-free individuals.

Compared to people without the condition, those with psoriasis were at higher risk of developing psychological problems, especially at younger ages.

About 26 per 1,000 afflicted individuals per year were diagnosed with depression, 21 with anxiety and one with suicidal thoughts and actions.

This means that about 10,400 diagnoses of depression may be chalked up to psoriasis each year in the UK, according to the report. For anxiety and suicide fantasies, the numbers are 7,100 and 340, respectively.

Exactly what accounts for the link between mental health and psoriasis is unclear. There is the obvious social embarrassment, traditionally considered at the root of the drinking and obesity problems that sometimes accompany the condition.

But there could also be another, less obvious explanation.

“Before we thought that you got psoriasis, you got depressed, you got obese,” said Bagel. “But it seems like there might be an underlying mechanism that unifies all these symptoms.”

People with psoriasis have higher levels of inflammatory chemicals in their blood, for instance. In principle, this could be part of the explanation why these people have more heart disease and diabetes.

Bagel said the right medications—such as steroid creams, light therapy, or pills—helped up to 90 percent of his patients. He said he regularly saw skin improvements of more than three-quarters.

For those who can’t clear their itchy skin and continue to experience psychological effects, Gelfand said there were several good treatment options.

Apart from psychiatric medications, he said, meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy had also been shown to be effective, likely because they reduce stress.

“When I counsel my patients,” he said, “I tell them they need to be aware of their whole health, not just their skin.”

SOURCE: Archives of Dermatology, August 16, 2010.

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Windsor Dermatology’s Dr. Jerry Bagel Available for Interview on Psoriasis Awareness Month

National Psoriasis Foundation Medical Board Member Urges Residents to Take the Psoriasis Challenge

August 9, 2010—EAST WINDSOR, NJ – According to the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF), psoriasis is the most common autoimmune disease in the U.S., affecting as many as 7.5 million Americans. Dr. Jerry Bagel, a leading provider of medical dermatological care for 25 years and member of NPF’s Medical Board, is urging local residents affected by psoriasis to take the “challenge,” and help find a cure.

During the month of August, NPF will be holding a “challenge” in honor of National Psoriasis Awareness Month open to anyone whose life has been affected by psoriasis. Participants will be sent a new awareness challenge daily e-mail, and for every one completed, they will be awarded points that may put them in the running to win one of several grand prizes at the end of the month. Through this event, NPF hopes to spread the word about psoriasis and gain the attention and funds necessary to help find a cure. More details can be found at www.psoriasisawarenessmonth.org.

“Psoriasis drastically impacts the emotions,” said Bagel. “A patient affected with psoriasis not only has to deal with pain and discomfort, but also with the self-esteem implications that comes with the disease. There currently is no cure for psoriasis, so it is imperative that awareness is raised so that more and more residents feel encouraged to get involved. The Psoriasis Awareness Month Challenge provides a great opportunity for residents to spread the word about psoriasis, all while helping to find a cure.”

Dr. Bagel is available to provide his expertise on the following psoriasis-related topics:

  • Health concerns including hypertension, heart attack and diabetes that frequently occurs with psoriasis.
  • The possibility of developing psoriatic arthritis, which causes pain, swelling, and stiffness around the joints.
  • Detection of psoriasis and several treatment options that includes the use of topicals, phototherapy, systemics and biologics.

Dr. Bagel is board certified in dermatology and is a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. His practice in East Windsor, New Jersey is home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey, the only treatment center in the region. In 2001 and 2003, he was named one of the top doctors in the state by New Jersey Monthly magazine and has been named a Top Doc in the Castle Connolly survey of physicians every year for the past 10 years. A Senior Attending Physician at the University Medical Center at Princeton, he is also a Clinical Associate Professor of Dermatology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and teaches at the Drexel University College of Medicine. He is regularly invited to speak across the country about the treatment of various dermatological conditions.

For more information about Windsor Dermatology, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

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About Windsor Dermatology
Windsor Dermatology is a practice composed of board certified medical dermatologists focused on helping area adults and children achieve and maintain healthy skin. The East Windsor-based practice is also home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey and has treated various disorders of the skin, hair, and nails for 25 years. For more information, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

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New Windsor Dermatologists

July 20, 2010—Celebrating 25 years of business this month, Windsor Dermatology of East Windsor has added Dr. Brian Keegan of Cranbury and Dr. Wendy Myers of Phillipsburg to its practice. Myers has experience in clinical trial research aimed at the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, an area of specialty for the practice that is also home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey. More information is available by visiting www.windsordermatology.com.

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Windsor Dermatology Celebrates 25th Anniversary and Welcomes New Doctors

All-Physician Staff Focused on Medical Dermatology

EAST WINDSOR, NJ—July 6, 2010—Celebrating 25 years of business this month, Windsor Dermatology announced the addition of two new physicians. Brian Keegan, Ph.D, M.D. and Wendy Myers, M.D. will join the practice this summer, creating an all-physician staff that possesses the experience and knowledge needed to maintain a focus on the practice of medical dermatology.

Dr. Keegan is a resident of Cranbury, New Jersey and holds a Ph.D and an M.D. from New York University. He completed his residency at the University of Miami and has been published in over 15 medical journals. Dr. Keegan has been recognized with numerous awards for his professional accomplishments and community service.

Dr. Myers, who is originally from Phillipsburg, New Jersey, recently relocated back after completing her residency in dermatology at the University of Vermont. She holds an M.D. from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), where she received several academic achievement awards. Dr. Myers also has experience in clinical trial research aimed at the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, an area of specialty for the practice which is also home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of New Jersey.

“In our 25th year of medical care, we’ve grown and expanded to meet the changing needs of our patients. I am excited about bringing on these two talented physicians to make Windsor Dermatology an all-physician staff totally dedicated to personal and efficient patient care,” said Jerry Bagel, M.D., Medical Director of Windsor Dermatology.

For more information about Windsor Dermatology, please visit www.windsordermatology.com or our blog at www.windsordermatology.blogspot.com.

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About Windsor Dermatology
Windsor Dermatology is a practice composed of board certified medical dermatologists focused on helping area adults and children achieve and maintain healthy skin. The East Windsor-based practice is also home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey and has treated various disorders of the skin, hair, and nails for 25 years. For more information, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

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Trying a Psoriasis Diet

By Dennis Thompson Jr.
Medically reviewed by Pat F. Bass III, MD, MPH

http://www.everydayhealth.com/psoriasis/trying-a-psoriasis-diet.aspx

June 9, 2010—There is a possible link between psoriasis symptoms and the foods you eat. Find out what to include and eliminate when trying a special diet as part of your psoriasis treatment plan.

People looking for an effective psoriasis treatment to ease itching and pain often will look to diet as one means of avoiding flare-ups and reducing symptoms. A psoriasis diet seems like a logical possibility, given the inflammatory nature of the disease and the ability of certain triggers to cause psoriasis to flare.

The reality of developing an effective psoriasis diet based on a list of specific foods is much more complicated. Doctors believe some foods may exacerbate symptoms or trigger flare-ups, and some foods that could actually serve as psoriasis treatments to help your body better respond to the disease. But not much scientific proof is available to back up any of these theories.

"There's minimal, if any, research in this area," says Stefan Weiss, MD a dermatologist in Boca Raton, Fla., and a member of the medical advisory board of the National Psoriasis Foundation.

Keeping that in mind, here are some foods suspected of being able to influence psoriasis for the better and for the worse.

Psoriasis: Foods That May Worsen Symptoms

You may want to consider eliminating or reducing these foods in your diet:

  • Wheat gluten and yeast. Some of the strongest scientific evidence linking psoriasis to diet involves the role of gluten in the disease. Recent studies have found a potential association between celiac disease and psoriasis. "Many people with psoriasis have gluten sensitivity, and some patients who go gluten-free see improvement in their symptoms," says Jerry Bagel, MD, a dermatologist in East Windsor, N.J., and a member of the medical advisory board of the National Psoriasis Foundation
  • The evidence surrounding gluten intolerance has led many to suspect that yeast intolerance also might play a factor in psoriasis, particularly the type of yeast known as candida. While research has linked candida infection with a worsening of psoriasis symptoms, there have been no studies that directly suggest that yeast intolerance plays a role in psoriasis.
  • Alcohol. Another well-known trigger for psoriasis is alcohol, which tends to dilate the blood vessels. "By opening the blood vessels, white blood cells have easier access to the skin, further promoting the anti-inflammatory response that causes psoriasis," Bagel says.
  • Fatty red meat and dairy. Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease, so it makes sense to avoid foods that prompt an inflammatory response. Fatty red meats are known to increase inflammation, as are whole milk and other high-fat dairy products.

Psoriasis: Foods That May Help Symptoms

These foods may be added to improve your diet:

  • Fish. Oily fish such as salmon and tuna contain plentiful amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, which have been scientifically proven to help reduce inflammation. Fish also contains large amounts of vitamins A and D, both of which are important nutrients for skin growth. "They work on the DNA to modulate epidermal growth, which helps skin develop normally," Bagel says.
  • Vegetables and fruits. Vegetables like broccoli and spinach are also a good source of vitamins as well as other key nutrients for skin development, Bagel says. Colorful vegetables are also loaded with antioxidants, which are believed to help reduce inflammation.
  • Herbs. A number of herbs are believed to be effective psoriasis treatments, including burdock root and oregano oil (which are eaten) and cayenne, Oregon grape, avocado oil, and aloe vera (which are rubbed on the skin in cream form).

Extreme Psoriasis Diets

While food may help your symptoms, you need to avoid fad diets that ask you to take extreme measures, Weiss says. These diets are likely to harm your health by robbing you of important nutrients while providing minimal relief for psoriasis.

"Moderate food intake and exercise is your best bet in every situation," he says. "All fad diets are problematic."

Last Updated: 06/09/2010

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Over exposure: New study highlights melanoma risk in tan bed users

By STEVE WOOD
May 31, 2010

Is that pre-vacation, wedding or prom tan really worth it?
No, medical experts agree.

"We're seeing skin cancer (developing) in younger people than we ever thought possible before," said Dr. Christine Papa, certified dermatologist and Mohs surgeon at Macaione & Papa Dermatology in Voorhees.

"We used to think of skin cancer as something affecting those 50 and over, but we're seeing people in their 30s and 40s with it."

The International Agency for Research on Cancer has pointed out tanning beds among the greatest cancer threats, classifying the ultraviolet-emitting beds in its highest cancer risk category and labeling them "carcinogenic to humans."

A new study released Thursday offered the strongest evidence yet that tanning bed use dramatically increases the risk of melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer, a disease that afflicts nearly 69,000 Americans and kills 7,000 each year.

People who have used tanning machines were 74 percent more likely to develop melanoma than others, according to a study of 2,268 patients reported in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Those who tanned the most — for 10 years or more — had more than twice the risk of melanoma compared with people who never used tanning beds, says co-author Martin Weinstock of the Brown University School of Medicine. Those risks didn't change when researchers accounted for age, sex, income, family history, education, skin and eye color, freckles, moles, sunscreen use or time in the sun.

Papa has her own questions about sunbeds.

"If it takes eight hours to get color outdoors but only 15 minutes to get that same color in a tanning bed, how can that not be dangerous?" asked Papa, who has detected melanoma in someone as young as 12.

Skin cancer isn't the only undesirable outcome of too much time tanning.

"Not only do they (sunbeds) increase the risk of skin cancer, but they create blotchy skin, wrinkled skin and people look older than what they need to," said Dr. Jerry Bagel, a dermatologist who teaches at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia.

"Melanoma also has a genetic component," Bagel said. "And it appears as dark, black and irregular spots on your body. If you detect it early, it's 100 percent curable. And the detection is simple."

Bagel, who practices at Windsor Dermatology in East Windsor, Mercer County, recommends that people start to schedule annual full-body skin examinations with their dermatologist at age 20.

"This test is simpler than a colonoscopy, a Pap smear and even a dental cleaning," Bagel said. "It's really an easy evaluation."

According to at least one study, a person gets 60 percent of his or her sun exposure before the age of 20, Bagel said.

"Kids have to be told to apply sunscreen 20 minutes prior to going out," Bagel said. "You want to be more vigilant about treating with sunscreen."

Papa said the most common tanning mistakes — besides tanning itself, which is a sign of skin damage — are not using enough lotion per application, a high enough SPF or the right lotion.

The SPF of a sunscreen denotes its effectiveness against UVB rays, which cause sunburns, but not the insidious UVA rays, Papa said.

"What many don't know is that UVA rays penetrate a little deeper and cause damage as well," said Papa, who recommends lotions labeled "broad spectrum" or "protect against UVB and UVA rays."

Sunscreen should be reapplied every two hours but perhaps less if you guard yourself with the right threads.

"The most important thing (people) can do from an aesthetics standpoint is to wear sunscreen and sun-protective clothing," said Papa, adding that such material is available in fashions from retailers such as LL Bean, Lands End, EMS, REI and various other catalogs and websites. "It's just another fabric; they look like normal clothes."

Not everyone is convinced that the evidence is conclusive linking tanning bed use to skin cancer.

In a statement, the Indoor Tanning Association's John Overstreet says scientists disagree about the link between melanoma and tanning beds. "When reputable researchers are coming to vastly different conclusions, it's clear that a lot more research is needed," he says. "The science on both sides of the question needs to be weighed before consideration is given to any sweeping policy changes."

And tanning salons don't only offer tanning beds to patrons seeking some color.

Achieving that desired bronze complexion without risking skin damage is possible through the innovation of spray-on tans, a popular service provided by many salons.

Bagel said the alternative to tanning is safe to use, though not as a shield.

"If people want to use the spray (tan) they can, but . . . don't think just because you use the sprays it'll give you sun protection," he said.
With summer approaching, it's time to hammer home the importance of sun protection, dermatologists say.

"Even one blistering sunburn can increase your risk of skin cancer. As few as five sunburns can double your risk of skin cancer," said Dr. Anjali Dahiya, a dermatologist at the Iris Cantor Women's Health Center at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, in a news release.

Teenage girls need to be especially vigilant about sun protection. Melanoma is the most common cancer in young women aged 25 to 29. Much of the sun-related skin damage in these young women occurred in their teens.

"Sun exposure plays a significant role in the development of melanoma. Although more adults are using sunscreens during outdoor activities, many are unaware of how important it is to make sure their children are getting the necessary skin protection," said Dr. Desiree Ratner, director of dermatologic surgery at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, in the news release.

Liz Szabo, Gannett ContentOne, and Robert Preidt, HealthDay, contributed to this report.

http://www.courierpostonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=20105310305

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Top New Jersey Dermatologist Named to National Psoriasis Foundation Medical Board

May 12, 2010EAST WINDSOR, NJ – Jerry Bagel, M.D., medical director at Windsor Dermatology and the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey, joined the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) Medical Board to provide guidance and expertise to the organization on all medical issues related to psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

Dr. Bagel brings more than 25 years of dermatology experience to the board, specializing in psoriasis. Besides being medical director at the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey, Dr. Bagel is a dermatology instructor at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York and Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, and a senior attending physician at the University Medical Center at Princeton University in New Jersey.

Additionally, Dr. Bagel is a nationally recognized expert on the treatment of psoriasis and speaks regularly on the various treatments for this disease, including phototherapy.

Dr. Bagel received his bachelor of arts degree in biology from Boston University and his master of science degree in biochemistry from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J. He earned his doctorate in medicine from New York’s Mt. Sinai School of Medicine.

“Dr. Bagel is one of the most accomplished thought leaders in dermatology,” said Randy Beranek, National Psoriasis Foundation president and CEO. “His expertise in psoriasis and dedicated service to people living with psoriatic disease will help our organization better serve these individuals.”

The NPF Medical Board facilitates access to quality care by advocating for better clinical research tools, promoting medical education, identifying and promoting medical professionals who most effectively treat psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, and assisting in the development of information relating to disease pathophysiology and disease management.

For more information about the National Psoriasis Foundation Medical Board, visit www.psoriasis.org/medicalboard.

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About Psoriasis
Psoriasis is the most prevalent autoimmune disease in the country, affecting as many as 7.5 million Americans. Appearing on the skin most often as red scaly patches that itch and bleed, psoriasis is chronic, painful, disfiguring and disabling. Up to 30 percent of people with psoriasis develop psoriatic arthritis, a related joint disease. There is no cure for psoriasis.

About the National Psoriasis Foundation
The National Psoriasis Foundation is the world's largest nonprofit organization serving people with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Our mission is to find a cure for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and to eliminate their devastating effects through research, advocacy and education. For more information, call the Psoriasis Foundation, headquartered in Portland, Ore., at 800.723.9166, or visit www.psoriasis.org.

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LeAnn Rimes Brings Battle With Psoriasis to Center Stage
Diagnosed at age 2, the singer is teaming with health groups to bolster patient support

Posted: April 23, 2010

By Amanda Gardner
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News)— The low point for country music star LeAnn Rimes came when her psoriasis got so bad she actually started bleeding onstage.

"I would bleed onstage because my skin would crack. It was so horrible," she said.

"Psoriasis definitely takes a physical and emotional toll. I've had to deal with people judging me," she added.

That is why Rimes is teaming up with the American Academy of Dermatology and the National Psoriasis Foundation to be a spokeswoman for the Stop Hiding From Psoriasis awareness campaign.

The campaign is urging people with psoriasis, a chronic skin condition, to pledge to get involved with their own disease, including making a commitment to find a good dermatologist, find the support they need, tell their story or just learn more about the disease.

"I wanted to be involved in this campaign to educate the rest of the world that this is not contagious. You're not going to get psoriasis by standing too close to us. We're human," Rimes said. "There are so many people out there who are dealing with this. We want to make people feel they're not alone in this fight against psoriasis," she explained.

"I hope this is kind of a chain reaction," she continued. "It's been so inspiring to me and also empowering to be able to talk about it. I hope this spirals out of controlin a good wayso we can better support each other."

According to the campaign, nearly 7 million Americans have psoriasis, an immune disorder where skin cells grow too fast, resulting in thickened or scaly patches. The condition usually arises in the teenage or young adult years and manifests mainly on the scalp, knees, elbows or torso, although it can develop anywhere on the skin or nails. There is no cure for psoriasis.

Rimes was diagnosed with the condition when she was only 2 years old. She remembers at one time having the characteristic blotches of thick, scaly, often itchy, skin all over her legs and trunk.

"I was wearing jeans in 105-degree weather. I didn't want to go out in a bathing suit," she said. "It definitely takes a toll on your self-esteem, especially as a girl."

At one point, Rimes was having to change medications every one-and-a-half years when the one she was on stopped working.

According to Dr. Jerry Bagel, a spokesman for the National Psoriasis Foundation, director of the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey in East Windsor and associate clinical professor of dermatology at Columbia University in New York City, people with psoriasis have a 50 percent increased risk for depression and increased use of antidepressant medications.

Fortunately, there are now more and better treatments than ever before.

"People with moderate to severe psoriasis now have many new options they didn't have 10, or even seven, years ago," Bagel said. "Since 2003, five new biologic agents have been approved by the FDA [U.S. Food and Drug Administration]."

Lifestyle factors, including a balanced diet and reducing stress, can also play a role, something Rimes said she learned firsthand.

"I have a great relationship with my doctor. I not only take medications but have made diet and lifestyle changes, just being active and getting out of my own head and really relieving stress with exercise, yoga, breathing," said Rimes, who has been clear of psoriasis outbreaks now for six years. "I stay away from fried foods and try to make the healthiest food choices I can," she added.

"I've learned to control it the best I can ... working around this crazy life I lead," she said.

The campaign is supported by pharmaceutical company Abbott.

More information

Learn more about the pledge at the Stop Hiding From Psoriasis campaign.

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Windsor Dermatology’s Dr. Jerry Bagel Available for Interview on Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month

Local Residents Urged to Educate Themselves Through Month of May and Beyond

EAST WINDSOR, NJ – April 19, 2010 – According to the American Academy of Dermatology, melanoma claims the life of one American almost every hour. Dr. Jerry Bagel, a leading provider of medical dermatologic care for 25 years, is urging local residents to make skin cancer screenings a top priority each year, as early detection is the key to successful treatment.

“This is the time of year when the warm weather can be especially deceiving,” said Bagel. “Residents need to take precautions to help prevent the incidence of this deadly disease, such as protecting themselves and their families with sun block, avoiding tanning beds, performing self skin exams and keeping up with regular physician screenings to monitor changes in moles, body hair and nails.”

Dr. Bagel is available to provide his expertise on the following skin cancer-related topics:

  • Skin types that are most at-risk. New studies show increased incidence of skin cancer among people of color, particularly young women—not just fair-skinned individuals with blonde or red hair and blue eyes, as traditionally thought.
  • How residents can help screen their loved ones using the “ABCDE” method of examination. Early detection increases the chance of successful treatment.
  • Skin cancer treatment options, such as Mohs surgery.

Dr. Bagel is board certified in dermatology and is a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. He has been practicing dermatology and dermatologic surgery in East Windsor, New Jersey for 25 years. In 2001 and 2003 he was named one of the top doctors in the state by New Jersey Monthly magazine and has been named a Top Doc in the Castle Connolly survey of physicians every year from 2001-2010. A Senior Attending Physician at the University Medical Center at Princeton, he is also a Clinical Associate Professor of Dermatology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and teaches at the Drexel University College of Medicine. He is regularly invited to speak across the country about the treatment of various dermatologic conditions.

For more information about Windsor Dermatology, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

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About Windsor Dermatology
Windsor Dermatology is a practice composed of board certified medical dermatologists focused on helping area adults and children achieve and maintain healthy skin. The East Windsor-based practice is also home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey and has treated various disorders of the skin, hair, and nails for 25 years. For more information, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

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Windsor Dermatology's Dr. Jerry Bagel Receives Top Honors

April 7, 2010

(picked up from MyCentralJersey.com)

Dr. Jerry Bagel, a nationally recognized expert in the treatment of psoriasis with experience treating Central New Jersey patients for 25 years, has received the top referrer award from the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) as the nation's number one recruiter of patients with psoriasis. He was recognized on March 6, 2010 at the 68th Annual American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting in Miami Beach, Florida.

NPF commended Dr. Bagel on his ongoing commitment to the treatment of psoriasis. Dr. Bagel presented research at the meeting on topical solutions for psoriasis, which may enhance the clinical benefit of cortisone in the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis

“As a medical dermatologist for 25 years, it means a lot to me to be recognized for bringing new solutions to my patients,” said Dr. Bagel. “I'm truly honored and will continue to do my best to make sure patients are informed about different options for treatment of psoriasis and other conditions.”

Since 2001, Dr. Bagel has served as advisor to NPF's Board of Trustees, its CEO and staff, providing medical guidance, editorial review of publications, speaking at professional meetings and working to identify issues and opportunities of critical importance to the group. Dr. Bagel founded NPF's executive committee of the President's Council and has raised over $750,000 in the past five years for psoriasis care and research.

For more information about Windsor Dermatology, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

###

About Windsor Dermatology
Windsor Dermatology is a practice composed of board certified medical dermatologists focused on helping area adults and children achieve and maintain healthy skin. The East Windsor-based practice is also home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey and has treated various disorders of the skin, hair, and nails for 25 years. For more information, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

About the National Psoriasis Foundation
The National Psoriasis Foundation is the world's largest nonprofit patient advocacy organization dedicated to fighting psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, and the voice for millions of Americans who are affected by these diseases. Our mission is to find a cure for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and to eliminate their devastating effects through research, advocacy and education. For more information, visit www.psoriasis.org.

http://www.allergic-skin.com/blog/Windsor-Dermatology39s-Dr-Jerry-Bagel-Receives-Top-Honors

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Windsor Hights Herald

March 26, 2010

East Windsor Doctor Honored

Dr. Jerry Bagel, a nationally recognized expert in the treatment of psoriasis with experience treating Central New Jersey patients for 25 years, has received the top referrer award from the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) as the nation's number one recruiter of patients with psoriasis. He was recognized on March 6, 2010 at the 68th Annual American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting in Miami Beach, Florida.

NPF commended Dr. Bagel on his ongoing commitment to the treatment of psoriasis. Dr. Bagel presented research at the meeting on topical solutions for psoriasis, which may enhance the clinical benefit of cortisone in the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis

“As a medical dermatologist for 25 years, it means a lot to me to be recognized for bringing new solutions to my patients,” said Dr. Bagel. “I’m truly honored and will continue to do my best to make sure patients are informed about different options for treatment of psoriasis and other conditions.”

Since 2001, Dr. Bagel has served as advisor to NPF’s Board of Trustees, its CEO and staff, providing medical guidance, editorial review of publications, speaking at professional meetings and working to identify issues and opportunities of critical importance to the group. Dr. Bagel founded NPF’s executive committee of the President's Council and has raised over $750,000 in the past five years for psoriasis care and research.

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Windsor Dermatology's Dr. Jerry Bagel Receives Top Honors

Dr. Jerry Bagel, a nationally recognized expert in the treatment of psoriasis with experience treating Central New Jersey patients for 25 years, has received the top referrer award from the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) as the nation's number one recruiter of patients with psoriasis. He was recognized on March 6, 2010 at the 68th Annual American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting in Miami Beach, Florida.

NPF commended Dr. Bagel on his ongoing commitment to the treatment of psoriasis. Dr. Bagel presented research at the meeting on topical solutions for psoriasis, which may enhance the clinical benefit of cortisone in the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis

“As a medical dermatologist for 25 years, it means a lot to me to be recognized for bringing new solutions to my patients,” said Dr. Bagel. “I'm truly honored and will continue to do my best to make sure patients are informed about different options for treatment of psoriasis and other conditions.”

Since 2001, Dr. Bagel has served as advisor to NPF's Board of Trustees, its CEO and staff, providing medical guidance, editorial review of publications, speaking at professional meetings and working to identify issues and opportunities of critical importance to the group. Dr. Bagel founded NPF's executive committee of the President's Council and has raised over $750,000 in the past five years for psoriasis care and research.

For more information about Windsor Dermatology, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

###

About Windsor Dermatology
Windsor Dermatology is a practice composed of board certified medical dermatologists focused on helping area adults and children achieve and maintain healthy skin. The East Windsor-based practice is also home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey and has treated various disorders of the skin, hair, and nails for 25 years. For more information, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

About the National Psoriasis Foundation
The National Psoriasis Foundation is the world's largest nonprofit patient advocacy organization dedicated to fighting psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, and the voice for millions of Americans who are affected by these diseases. Our mission is to find a cure for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and to eliminate their devastating effects through research, advocacy and education. For more information, visit www.psoriasis.org.

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Windsor Dermatology’s Dr. Jerry Bagel Receives Top Honors at American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting

National Psoriasis Foundation Recognizes Local Dermatologist for Outstanding Psoriasis Care

EAST WINDSOR, NJ – March 16, 2010 – Dr. Jerry Bagel, a nationally recognized expert in the treatment of psoriasis with experience treating Central New Jersey patients for 25 years, has received the top referrer award from the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) as the nation's number one recruiter of patients with psoriasis. He was recognized on March 6, 2010 at the 68th Annual American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting in Miami Beach, Florida.

NPF commended Dr. Bagel on his ongoing commitment to the treatment of psoriasis. Dr. Bagel presented research at the meeting on topical solutions for psoriasis, which may enhance the clinical benefit of cortisone in the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis

“As a medical dermatologist for 25 years, it means a lot to me to be recognized for bringing new solutions to my patients,” said Dr. Bagel. “I’m truly honored and will continue to do my best to make sure patients are informed about different options for treatment of psoriasis and other conditions.”

Since 2001, Dr. Bagel has served as advisor to NPF’s Board of Trustees, its CEO and staff, providing medical guidance, editorial review of publications, speaking at professional meetings and working to identify issues and opportunities of critical importance to the group. Dr. Bagel founded NPF’s executive committee of the President's Council and has raised over $750,000 in the past five years for psoriasis care and research.

For more information about Windsor Dermatology, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

###

About Windsor Dermatology
Windsor Dermatology is a practice composed of board certified medical dermatologists focused on helping area adults and children achieve and maintain healthy skin. The East Windsor-based practice is also home to the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey and has treated various disorders of the skin, hair, and nails for 25 years. For more information, please visit www.windsordermatology.com.

About the National Psoriasis Foundation
The National Psoriasis Foundation is the world's largest nonprofit patient advocacy organization dedicated to fighting psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, and the voice for millions of Americans who are affected by these diseases. Our mission is to find a cure for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and to eliminate their devastating effects through research, advocacy and education. For more information, visit www.psoriasis.org.

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Windsor Dermatology’s Dr. Jerry Bagel Receives Top Honors at American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting

National Psoriasis Foundation Recognizes Local Dermatologist for Outstanding Psoriasis Care

Dr. Jerry Bagel, a nationally recognized expert in the treatment of psoriasis with experience treating Central New Jersey patients for 25 years, has received the top referrer award from the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) as the nation's number one recruiter of patients with psoriasis. He was recognized on March 6, 2010 at the 68th Annual American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting in Miami Beach, Florida.

NPF commended Dr. Bagel on his ongoing commitment to the treatment of psoriasis. Dr. Bagel presented research at the meeting on topical solutions for psoriasis, which may enhance the clinical benefit of cortisone in the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis

“As a medical dermatologist for 25 years, it means a lot to me to be recognized for bringing new solutions to my patients,” said Dr. Bagel. “I’m truly honored and will continue to do my best to make sure patients are informed about different options for treatment of psoriasis and other conditions.”

Since 2001, Dr. Bagel has served as advisor to NPF’s Board of Trustees, its CEO and staff, providing medical guidance, editorial review of publications, speaking at professional meetings and working to identify issues and opportunities of critical importance to the group. Dr. Bagel founded NPF’s executive committee of the President's Council and has raised over $750,000 in the past five years for psoriasis care and research.

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Growing Skin Cancer Incidence Prompts Central NJ Dermatologists to Add Surgical Specialist Matt Halpern, M.D.

Summer may be ending, but the incidence of skin cancer is a year-round phenomenon, with more than one million additional Americans diagnosed each year. According to JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in the course of a lifetime.

With these facts in mind, Windsor Dermatology of East Windsor, NJ, has added a skin cancer surgery specialist — Matthew Halpern, M.D. — to offer patients Mohs micrographic surgery, which has the highest cure rate for basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas.

Mohs surgery is unique in its precision, allowing Dr. Halpern to preserve more normal tissue than any other method while at the same time allowing him to trace and eradicate areas of tumor that are invisible to the naked eye. Mohs surgery is particularly suitable for skin cancers of the face and head, where the preservation of normal tissue is essential.

Windsor Dermatology’s Medical Director, Jerry Bagel, M.D., commented, “Dr. Halpern adds outstanding skills and experience to our ongoing mission of bringing our patients the highest quality dermatological care. With early detection and skilled treatment, our skin cancer patients can expect very favorable outcomes.”

Dr. Halpern joins the Windsor Dermatology practice with an impressive background, including a Fellowship in Mohs Surgery and Cutaneous (skin) Oncology at New York Presbyterian Hospital, a stint as Chief Resident in dermatology at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital in New York, his M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School, and undergraduate degree from Swarthmore College.

Dr. Halpern is Board Certified, and licensed in New Jersey, Pennsylvania and New York. He is a member of the Attending Staff at the University Medical Center at Princeton. In addition to his specialty in skin cancer surgery, he has researched psoriasis treatment and was the 2005 recipient of a Women’s Dermatologic Society Mentorship grant.

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Physician Appointed to National Vitiligo Foundation Board

Jerry Bagel, MD of Windsor Dermatology, East Windsor, NJ has been appointed to the medical advisory board of the National Vitiligo Foundation.

Vitiligo is a skin condition that occurs when the skin pigment cells deteriorate, creating irregular white patches on the skin. Vitiligo affects at least 1% of the population and is not yet curable. It is not contagious or painful, but it can be emotionally damaging. The National Vitiligo Foundation works to educate the community about vitiligo, and to counsel and support vitiligo patients.

Dr. Bagel is a board certified dermatologist and has practiced dermatology for nearly 25 years. He is actively researching potential cures and treatments for vitiligo. His practice offers the leading treatment, phototherapy, which can help skin pigment return in patients with vitiligo.

Dr. Bagel is a former member of the medical advisory board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. He was the only physician listed as a finalist for the Foundation’s 2007 Volunteer of the Year Award. Dr. Bagel is a nationally recognized expert in the treatment of psoriasis and is the founder and medical director of The Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey. The Center offers advanced therapies which were formerly only available through university hospitals in major cities.

Dr. Bagel earned his MD from Mt. Sinai School of Medicine and completed his residency at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. He is a Clinical Assistant Professor of dermatology at the medical school of Columbia University and is a Senior Attending Physician at the University Medical Center at Princeton. Dr. Bagel has twice been recognized as one of the top doctors in the state in the New Jersey Monthly magazine.

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Dr. Jerry Bagel Addresses Israeli Dermatology Conference

(July 22, 2008: New Jersey Jewish News) - Jerry Bagel, MD of Windsor Dermatology, East Windsor, NJ recently spoke at the annual meeting of the Israel Society of Dermatology in Tel Aviv on June 17 and at the Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem on “Safety Issues in the Biologic Treatment of Psoriasis” and “How I Use Biologic Agents in the Treatment of Psoriasis.”

Earlier this year, Bagel spoke at the second Pan Arab Psoriasis Summit in Cairo, Egypt.

He is a board certified dermatologist and has practiced dermatology for nearly 25 years. He is the founder and medical director of The Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey. Bagel is a former member of the medical advisory board of the National Psoriasis Foundation and the only physician listed as a finalist for the Foundation’s 2007 Volunteer of the Year Award.

He is a clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University and is a senior attending physician at the University Medical Center at Princeton. Bagel has twice been recognized as one of the top doctors in the state in New Jersey Monthly magazine. He is a member of Congregation Beth Chaim in West Windsor.

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National Psoriasis Foundation Honors Dr. Bagel

(September, 2007) Dr. Jerry Bagel, a Senior Attending Physician at the University Medical Center at Princeton, has been honored by the National Psoriasis Foundation for his work in fund raising and medical consultation. Since 2001, Dr. Bagel has served as advisor to the Psoriasis Foundation Board of Trustees, its CEO and staff, providing medical guidance, editorial review of publications, speaking at professional meetings and working to identify issues and opportunities of critical importance to the group.

At this summer’s national conference in Las Vegas, Dr. Bagel addressed the group on the latest developments in addressing psoriasis treatment, with emphasis on the new use of biologicals with psoriasis patients.

He has been involved in a fundraising campaign that raised more than $500,000 for education, advocacy and research for the organization. He has referred more patients to membership in the Psoriasis Foundation than anyone else in the United States. Dr. Bagel is the only physician to be listed as a finalist for the 2007 Volunteer of the Year Award which honors the initiative, sustained commitment, and results that these volunteers bring to the Foundation. He was recognized at the conference and awarded a certificate of appreciation.

Dr. Bagel is a board certified dermatologist and a nationally recognized expert in the treatment of psoriasis. He is the founder and medical director of the Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey, located in East Windsor. (www.psoriasiscare.com) The Center is New Jersey’s first complete facility for advanced therapies formerly available only through university hospitals in major cities. He earned his MD from Mt. Sinai School of Medicine and completed a residency in dermatology at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. He is a medical editor for Practical Dermatology and the author of that publication's monthly column on psoriasis. He is the principal investigator in a clinical study examining the impact of diet on psoriasis treatment. In addition, Dr. Bagel is a Clinical Assistant Professor of dermatology at the medical schools of both Columbia University and Drexel University.

More than seven million Americans have psoriasis. Although there is no cure for psoriasis, many effective treatments are available. In selecting an appropriate treatment method, the dermatologist will consider the location and severity of involvement along with the patient’s medical history.

The mission of the National Psoriasis Foundation is to improve the quality of life of people who have psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Through education and advocacy, the organization promotes awareness and ensures access to treatment and supports research that will lead to effective management and ultimately a cure. The organization's headquarters is in Portland, Oregon.

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